How To Buy or Sell a Playstation

The Sony PlayStation is the biggest selling game console of all time with more than 102 million units sold and counting. Released in the US in 1995, it is thought that one in three households has one now. With killer ap games such as Ridge Racer, Grand Turismo, Final Fantasy VII, Resident Evil and Tekken, the PlayStation was the console that all others aspired to emulate. Before searching for a used one (production stopped as of March 23, 2006) or deciding to sell yours, there are quite a few things to consider.

  1. Where to buy and sell. There are a couple places to buy and sell Sony PlayStations and the prices should all be around the same range. First of all, you can try your neighborhood video game store. Places like EB Games and Game Stop will have plenty in stock and might even have a little warranty for them. Selling them here will not fetch you much compared to the open market but these businesses will take them off your hands if you don't care to get top dollar.

    Amazon and other online shopping sites are good too but the best online option, of course, is Ebay. Search on Ebay for "sony playstation" and watch the results accumulate. On the left will be a section called "Matching Categories," under which you'll see "Video Games." Click on "Systems," and you'll be taken to another page where, on the left once again in the section "Matching Categories," you will this time look for "Sony PlayStation." Click this to narrow your search results to just the original PlayStation. You may also just click on this link to visit : http://video-games.search.ebay.com/playstation_Systems_W0QQsacatZ62054. Search for "PSone" if you prefer that version. If you're selling, Ebay is also the best place to do your dealings, but Craigslist.org provides great opportunities for both buying and selling. 

  2. Choosing and identifying PlayStations. There are basically two types of Sony PlayStations available: the original PlayStation and the newer, smaller PSone released in 1999. The original PS has a few variants that could affect your purchasing decision. The first production runs of PlayStations had an overheating problem that was corrected in later builds. As with any new product, there are bugs in the first batches of PlayStations that also included bad disc lasers. So I would suggest finding a 1997 or later year console. These have model numbers higher than the original SCPH 100's and up to the SCPH 1002's. Here is a quick link to help identify your PlayStation: http://www.plasma-online.de/index.html?content=http%3A//www.plasma-online.de/english/help/solutions/playstation_id.html.

    If you really want to be safe, look for the 1999 and later PSone's. They look better and play well and the price difference these days is negligible. The PSone sports a smaller, rounded white case. In any event, ask the seller what model number is on the back of his particular unit.

  3. Pricing. It all depends on the accessory package that you want to buy or sell with the PS. More schwag translates to more bucks. If you are buying, I'd look for a package that includes at least six games, two controllers, a memory card and all necessary audio/video cables. This won't cost more than $25 to $40 including shipping from Ebay. The same thing without games should be $20 at a store. Personally I like the PSone setup with the LCD screen and battery pack. This is a portable PSone you can take anywhere! It'll set you back around $60 to $90 but it is the ultimate set up. Take a look at it: http://www.pricescan.com/ItemImages/ImagesL/811691.jpg.

    Selling on an auction site, I'd set the starting bid at $9.99 (this always gets the bidding started early) and the shipping around $15 USPS. You should get on average $30 to $40 for the system and a few games when selling to a private buyer. With so many PlayStations on the market it should be easy to find the perfect deal for you. Given its popularity, the PlayStation should be just as easy for you to sell one at a reasonable price. Have fun gaming!

 

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