How To Construct a Compound Sentence

After learning how to construct simple sentences, you are now ready for a new English grammar challenge--how to construct a compound sentence. Compound sentences are two or more simple sentences fused together into a simple sentence.

Combining simple sentences into a compound sentence is easy, especially as you have three methods to choose from:

  1. Coordinating conjunctions, which consist of for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.
  2. Semi-colon.
  3. Conjunctive adverbs like accordingly, furthermore, consequently, however, also, indeed, instead, likewise, on the other hand, nevertheless, otherwise, as a result, still, therefore, thus, on the contrary, and indeed.

Each of these types follows a certain pattern when creating compound sentences.

Coordinating Conjunction

Sentence pattern: <independent clause>, <coordinating conjunction> <independent clause>.

  1. Think of two simple sentences. Examples:
    The sun shines everyday.
    It's a start of a new beginning.
  2. Decide on the proper coordinating conjunction to use. Memorize this coordinating conjunction as FANBOYS (for, and, but, or, yet, so).
  3. Put a comma after the first independent clause (simple sentence), just before the coordinating conjunction.

Combining these steps will result in:

The sun shines everyday, for it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday, and it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday, so it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday, or it's a start of a new beginning.

Take note, we did not use yet and but because the independent clauses are not contrasting.

 

Semi-colon

Sentence pattern: <independent clause>; <independent clause>.

  1. Think of two simple sentences like the two mentioned above.
  2. Simply put a semicolon after the first independent clause.

So if we use the example above, it will be:

The sun shines everyday; it's a start of a new beginning.

This method of constructing compound sentences is stronger in emphasis than other methods. But it actually depends on your writing style. Many people use a comma in place of the semi-colon, which is wrong in English grammar. If you use comma, make sure to use a coordinating conjunction after it.

 

Conjunctive Adverb

Sentence pattern: <independent clause>; <conjunctive adverb>, <independent clause>.

  1. Construct two simple sentences just like the above examples.
  2. Decide the best conjunctive adverb to connect the two sentences.

If we use the example above, we'll have these sentences:

The sun shines everyday; indeed, it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday; thus, it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday; therefore, it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday; in other words, it's a start of a new beginning.

The sun shines everyday; as a result, it's a start of a new beginning.

Learn more through practice. You can also try some famous phrases or other parts of speech like adjective to make the sentence structure more colorful.

Just keep in mind the rules when creating compound sentences whenever you practice. Don't worry if you make some mistakes when using adjectives or other phrases. Just keep on practicing on different structures and combinations. Sooner or later, you'll be able to create compound sentences without even checking the grammar rules.

 

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