How To Care for Beagles

Vet care for beagles

Beagles come in two varieties - those that are under 13 inches and those that are over 13 inches. Members of the Hound Group, these furry companions have moderate energy levels and are capable of being quiet when properly trained. Beagles play well with both children and other pets, as they are blessed with a patient, fun-loving disposition. They make great indoor or outdoor pets! Typical coloring is tan and black, lemon or red. Beagles may or may not bear white markings.

  1. When bringing a beagle into your family, one of your first responsibilities is to provide a secure yard for the dog. Even if you plan to keep your beagle indoors, she'll need a secure area for potty purposes. Beagles are notorious for their curiosity and their great sense of smell. If your beagle gets a good whiff of something that catches her fancy, instinct will assume control and she'll be gone. When planning your fence, keep in mind that beagles can dig their way out of a yard. You should put a hedge in front of your fence (or have a line of cement under your fence) to deter your beagle from leaving.
  2. You should take your beagle to the veterinarian for vaccinations. At this time, talk with your vet about worming and flea and tick control products. You should also follow up with booster vaccinations when needed. Talk with your vet about health problems that can sometimes afflict beagles, such as retinal atrophy, cataracts, polyarthritis, congestive heart failure, hypothyroidism, epilepsy and glaucoma.
  3. Beagles should not be fed "people" food. Beagles do best on a high-quality, dry dog food. Regularly eating people food often causes these small creatures to pack on the pounds, which can be detrimental to their health.
  4. Play or exercise with your beagle at least an hour a day. This will provide a productive outlet for his energy, and he'll thrive under the attention.
  5. Beagles do not require much in the way of grooming. Many people choose a beagle over other breeds because they are low-maintenance. This does not mean that you should let Fido go without a bath, though. Beagles shed year-round. How often your beagle will need a bath will be determined by her living conditions. Outdoor beagles will require more regular bathing than beagles that are indoor dogs. Whether indoor or outdoor, brush your beagle two or three times each week. Many beagle owners state that using a hound's glove is the best way to keep shedding under control.
  6. Beagles' ears droop and hang, promoting accumulation of dirt. You should clean your beagle's ears every time you brush him to keep your dog's ear free of infection and odor.
  7. Anyone who has beagles should start training them early. This establishes the dog's place in the family so that she won't forget you are the boss. While beagles can be independent, with consistency they can be trained.

 

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